CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

Stepping into the role of president in 1963, Lyndon B. Johnson was tasked with passing bills President Kennedy had endorsed. This legislation included the bill that was to become the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which was heavily opposed by the Southern Democrats—a more conservative group at the time.

SHIFTING POLITICAL PARTIES

HAVE WE SEEN EQUALITY?

THINK ABOUT THIS:

"Until justice is blind to color, until education is unaware of race, until opportunity is unconcerned with the color of men's skins, emancipation will be a proclamation but not a fact. To the extent that the proclamation of emancipation is not fulfilled in fact, to that extent we shall have fallen short of assuring freedom to the free."

– Lyndon B. Johnson

LIVING UNDER JIM CROW

Although the 13th Amendment abolished slavery in 1865, African Americans’ rights continued to be limited by Jim Crow until 1965. This system of local and state laws rationalized racial segregation as “separate but equal.”

CIVIL RIGHTS GROUPS

CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference was the largest civil rights group during LBJ’s presidency. Organized through churches, SCLC was run by Martin Luther King Jr.

The oldest civil rights group featured in All the Way, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People sought legislative action instead of protests.

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee organized young Americans interested in civil rights.

Copyright Alley Theatre Education & Community Engagement 2015.