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Who's Who?

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click on the character's name for special insight

Did you know?...

TWELFTH NIGHT OR WHAT YOU WILL

 

Twelfth Night? 

We aren’t sure of the exact reason Shakespeare entitled this play as such, but theories include:

  • The play may have premiered on this holiday.

  •  It is a nod to the holiday’s Roman origin. SATURNALIA was celebrated by role reversals, revelry, and an abandonment of the normal rules of society. Men would often dress as women, which is a huge plot point in Shakespeare’s play.

  • CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE HOLIDAY

 

What you Will?

But what does that mean? Well, like many things relating to Shakespeare, we don’t know for certain. But our favourite theory is that Shakespeare was saying, 

“UM I DON'T REALLY CARE. CALL IT WHAT YOU WANT.”

EPIPHANY

Twelfth Night is a holiday that’s also known as the Feast of the Epiphany. It is held on the twelfth night after Christmas and commemorates the coming of the Magi, as well as Christ’s baptism. 

 

It also concludes the “Twelve Days of Christmas”, as featured in the classic Christmas song. Various cultures have celebrated this holiday in a number of ways, but current ways include  THROWING A PARTY or a PARADE FOR MARDI GRAS.

Yeah, but what's an "Epiphany"?

Epiphany is defined as: 

What's special about THIS production?

DIRECTOR JOHNATHAN MOSCONE'S VISION FOR  
 
TWELFTH NIGHT 

 

"...Twelfth Night is my jam. It’s categorized as a comedy, which in classical terminology means it has a happy ending for society, usually through the means of marital union. And that does happen in this play. But it’s not a happy ending for everyone. And it’s not a comedy all of the time..."  

KEEP READING >

Constructing the Set

DID YOU KNOW?...

It's taken over a year to prepare for the performances you will see? We pick the season in January and February, then hire designers who begin to conceptualize with the director to determine the thematic direction of the production. Ultimately our production staff can take up to six months to construct the set, costumes, lighting, and sound design. Rehearsals can last four weeks. The next step, which usually lasts one to two weeks, is the technical rehearsals where everything comes together on the stage. Finally, we have previews so the actors can further perfect their performances with a real audience . . . and then . . . (drum roll) opening night!

Before you arrive...

You play an important role in the play. Watch this video to learn more.

Copyright Alley Theatre Education & Community Engagement 2015.