HAVE AN ADVENTURE

BECOME A MASTER STORYTELLER

Aside from being a master of invention, 80 Days author Jules Verne was a masterful storyteller who wrote incredible adventures. On this page, teachers and families will find cool ways to make up and generate their own adventures.

THINK ABOUT

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A JOURNEY AND AN ADVENTURE?

JOURNEY

A trip from one place to another

 

Here’s the journey Phileas Fogg takes in Around the World in 80 Days.

 

MR. FOGG’S ITINERARY

London to Egypt by train and steamer....................7 days

Egypt to India by steamer..............................................13 days

Across India by train and elephant..............................3 days

India to China by steamer..............................................13 days

China to Japan by steamer..............................................6 days

Japan to San Francisco by steamer.......................22 days

San Francisco to New York City by train............7 days

NYC to London by steamer and train........................8 days

ADVENTURE

An unusual and exciting activity, especially when travelling to a new place

 

In Around the World in 80 Days, Phileas Fogg travels through foreign places. As he races the clock to make it back to London on time, he faces obstacles that add adventure to his journey. 

 

If Fogg makes it back on time, he will win £20,000! If not, he loses his wager and the cost of the trip. 

 

Fogg’s bank account......................£40,000 ($4.8M today)

Amount wagered.................................£20,000 ($2.4M today)

Cost of trip............................................£19,000+ ($2.3M today)

HAVE AN ADVENTURE

Alley Theatre’s production of Around the World in 80 Days uses many theatrical conventions to tell Verne’s story. This allows our artists and audience to experience the excitement of Phileas Fogg’s adventure in an amusing and interesting way. With the links below, see if you can make up your own stories and figure out how to stage them.

Kids &

Kids at Heart

ACTIVITY

Older Kids

ACTIVITY

High School

ACTIVITY

CONDUCTED STORY

Have players form a line on the stage (or you can create an order in a car, at the dinner table, etc.). Make up a title for a story, and decide on a genre (e.g., mystery, crime, science fiction, or romance). If there is an audience, have them give you the title and genre.

 

Decide on the emcee. This should be someone capable of leading the activity. The emcee will start the game by pointing to a player, who begins telling the story. The story can be wacky but must make sense. The player must keep making up the story until the emcee switches and points to another person. At any point in time, the emcee can switch to another player, who must continue the story flawlessly—no matter if the switch happens in the middle of a sentence or even the middle of a word.

 

Players who hesitate, are grammatically incorrect, or don’t make sense are out of the game. In its original form developed by American theatre innovator Viola Spolin, everyone would have practiced a melodramatic unrealistic stage death, and the audience would shout, “Die.” This created fun and theatricality for participants who were called out. As a family or team, you can use any type of “out” you like.

 

The last player left ends the story and wins the game.

TERMS TO KNOW

Here are some terms you’ll encounter on your journey with Phileas Fogg in Around the World in 80 Days. While these terms might seem foreign, Jules Verne used them in his original story to create a more colorful adventure.

ACTIVITY

Copyright Alley Theatre Education & Community Engagement 2015.